Harbours on Las Islas Baleares

 

 

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Pilot:  Islas Baleares.   Sixth Edition.   Imray Laurie Norie & Wilson.

 

 

Puerto de San Antonio Abad

Isla de Ibiza

Lat

38° 58'.5N

Long

001° 17'.9E

 

 

Information Date:

March, 1999

Pilot Page Number:

36

 

The proposed enlargement of the marina has been completed.  Two lines of floating pontoons have been installed running out from the narrow section of the main harbour wall that joins the Ro-Ro berth to the land.  The outer line of pontoons is longer than the inner.  Each line of pontoons has a security gate at its head.  Mooring is bow or stern to using laid moorings tailed to the pontoons.  Water and electricity are laid on.

 

The majority of visitors now appear to be asked to berth on the new pontoons.  Protection is excellent.  We rode out a northwest gale on them and no swell worked its way in.  On the down side, it is a long walk from them to the Club Nautico and, having arrived there, the showers are fairly primitive!  Mooring charges out of season were very reasonable - 2,720 pts per night including water and electricity dropping to 1,105 pts after 3 nights.  We stayed for eight nights at an average cost of 1,710 pts per night including water and electricity.

 

There are regular (and cheap) buses from close by the root of the harbour wall to Ibiza town.  These pass by a very large supermarket on the outskirts of Ibiza Town, which is worth visiting if you require a major re-stock.

 

 

 

Puerto de Sabina

Isla de Formentera

Lat

38° 44'.1N

Long

001° 25'.2E

 

 

Information Date:

April 1999

Pilot Page Number:

53

 

Berthing charges in the two marinas are identical: the tariff is printed on notepaper with both names printed at the top!  Out-of-season charges are low with every seventh night (in the same marina) free.  If you head for Formentera Mar, beware being placed on the long quay that runs parallel to the travel-lift bay.  This is open to the sea and subject to swell in northeasterly winds.  Similarly, the southern part of Marina de Formentera is exposed. The inner (eastern) part of Formentera Mar is well protected, as is the inner (northern) part of Marina de Formentera.  If you are there out of season, stand your ground and only accept a protected berth.

 

Camping Gaz is not available in Sabina but it can be obtained from the fereteria in San Francisco Javier.  There is a very convenient new cash machine on the outer wall of the Ferry Terminal.

 

 

 

Puerto de Ibiza

Isla de Ibiza

Lat

38° 54'.7N

Long

001° 26'.7E

 

 

Information Date:

April 1999

Pilot Page Number:

22

 

The Port Authority Pontoons in the southwest of the harbour are fitted with very substantial, card-operated security gates.  As a card is needed to get out of the gates as well as to get back in, these pontoons are of little use to visitors.  A prolonged search failed to locate a source for the cards and, in any case, almost all the berths are occupied by local boats.  Some pontoons have been reinstated inside the southwest breakwater, but they are only suitable for small motor boats and are fully occupied by locals.

 

The visitors’ berths at the Club Nautico are very exposed, not only to wash as the pilot says, but also to a considerable fetch from the east.  The outer pier to which one moors is very dilapidated and is falling into the sea.  We attempted to wheel a shopping trolley along it, much to the amusement of everyone else!

 

Marina Botafoch is well protected and has excellent facilities and the water taxi makes visiting Ibiza Town easy.  However, it can be very expensive for a short stay, as there is a connection charge for both water and electricity in addition to the metered charge for usage.  Beware!

 

There is an excellent, large supermarket somewhat northeast of the letter ‘A’ in IBIZA in the top left-hand corner of the plan on page 25 in the Pilot.

 

Camping Gaz is not as ubiquitous as the pilot suggests!  The very large chandlery opposite the Club Nautico does not stock it, nor could we find a shop in the town that did.  Perhaps others will have better luck!

 

We were in Ibiza town on Good Friday to see the ‘Procession of Penitents’ from the cathedral, down the hill to the town and back up again.  It is well worth going out of your way to see.

 

 

 

Puerto de Andraitx

Isla de Mallorca

Lat

39° 32'.7N

Long

002° 22'.8E

 

 

Information Date:

April 1999

Pilot Page Number:

83

 

Despite arriving out of season we could find no room at all on the Port Authority Quay or on their pontoon.  All the places were taken by local boats or long-term ‘residents.’  We spoke to friends who had found a vacant berth, which they entered, only to be assailed by a ‘resident’, who considered the berth to be his.  Our friends stood their ground, but others might not wish to engage the battle!  There are large boulders in the water all along the inside edge of the Local Authority Quay so, even if you do find a space there, unless you have a very, very long passerelle, you will have to dinghy ashore!

 

We moored on the Club de Vela Quay near the travel lift.  It was comfortable though quite expensive. (4,000 pts including water and electricity)  The showers were only available at restricted times.

 

 

 

Cala Portals

Isla de Mallorca

Lat

39° 28'.5N

Long

002° 31'.5E

 

 

Information Date:

April 1999

Pilot Page Number:

75

 

Cala Portals is very pretty but beware, holding is poor.  Although much of the bottom appears to be sandy, in many places it is hard, flat sandstone rock like the surrounding cliffs.  We spend much of our life attached to mother earth by our 20kg Bruce, but here we had great difficulties!

 

 

 

Puerto de Palma

Isla de Mallorca

Lat

39° 33'.5N

Long

002° 38'.0E

 

 

Information Date:

April 1999

Pilot Page Number:

65

 

There is a mistake on the plan on page 64 in the pilot and consequent confusion in the paragraph on Berthing on page 67.  The pontoon labelled as the Pantalan Mediterraneo on the plan is, in fact, a rather flimsy floating pontoon known as the Pantalan de la Cuarentena.  It appears to be used by a Brokerage and is of no interest to visiting yachtsmen.  The real Pantalan Mediterraneo is the longer of the two quays referred to in the text as Port Authority Jetties.  (The root of the real Pantalan Mediterraneo is by the letter ‘M’ in the word Maritimo on the plan)

 

The description of the Pier 46 berths on page 67 is correct, once one knows where the Pantalan Mediterraneo really is.  However, the description of the ‘Port Authority Jetties’ needs altering to read ‘jetty’ in the singular.  When we were in Palma there were no visiting yachts on the remaining Port Authority Jetty and it had a somewhat deserted look about it.

 

According to a locally based yachtsman, the Local Authority ‘privatised’ the Pantalan Mediterraneo a few years ago and is in the process of doing the same for the remaining quay.  Rumour has it that Pier 46 have put in a bid.

 

A new floating pontoon has been ‘moored’ parallel to and just off the Paseo Maritimo just north of the Pantalan Mediterraneo.  It appears to be owned and used by a Charter Company and is therefore of little interest to visiting yachtsmen.  It reduces the length of Public Quay available along the Paseo Maritimo by about 20% though there is still plenty of room there for those happy to moor there using their own anchor.

 

Our visit to Palma was during the last week of April.  There was a boat show in the Pier 46 marina and the displaced locals had been accommodated in the other marinas.  As a result, visitors’ berths were rarer than hen’s teeth.  As the boat show would appear to be an annual event, members planning a visit in April might like to bear this in mind.

 

 

 

Porto Colom

Isla de Mallorca

Lat

39° 25'.4N

Long

003° 15'.8E

 

 

Information Date:

May 1999

Pilot Page Number:

127

 

As in Andraitx, we could find no room on the Port Authority Pontoons.  We attempted to make fast at the Club Nautico but a heavy surge made their visitors’ berths untenable.  (The wind was S4)  We anchored in 2 metres in the Ensenada de la Basa Nova inside all the other anchored yachts and well inside the 2m contour shown on the plan on page 129 in the pilot.  Being well tucked in behind Sa Bateria we were protected from the swell which had caused us so much difficulty at the Club Nautico though we only had 30cm under our keel!  We were not charged for anchoring.

 

We found an excellent Service Laundry close to the SYP supermarket just north of the Ensenada de la Basa Nova and in the vicinity of the letter ‘C’ in Porto Colom on the plan on page 129 in the pilot.  We were charged 1,000 pts for 10kg including drying and folding.  The sheets were even ironed!

 

 

 

Porto Cristo

Isla de Mallorca

Lat

39° 32'.3N

Long

003° 20'.5E

 

 

Information Date:

May 1999

 

Pilot Page Number:

122

 

We were fortunate in finding space on the Public Quay.  Since the pilot was published moorings have been laid here with lazy-lines tailed back to the quay making mooring in the confined space far easier.  We were charged only 500 pts per night - a bargain in anyone’s money!

 

The pilot mentions the caves  but does not make it clear that one complex (Cuevas del Drach) is in easy walking distance of the quays.  From the road bridge, walk west then south, up the hill and the caves are just out of the town on the left.  By contrast, a visit to the Cuevas del Hams requires a bus, which can be caught just inland from the Public Quay.

 

 

 

Puerto de Ciudadela

Isla de Menorca

Lat

39° 59'.8 N

Long

003° 49'.5 E

 

 

Information Date:

May, 1999

Pilot Page Number:

196

 

The town of Ciudadela is a delight to explore but the harbour is a nightmare.  We would suggest giving the harbour a miss and visiting the town by bus or hire car from Mahón.

 

We stayed for one night on the Public Quay referred to as ‘Visitors Berths’ on the plan on page 198 and as ‘Port Authority moorings’ in the text on page 200.  There are no mooring lines.  We moored stern-to using our bower anchor set well across the cala towards the Commercial Quay.  Cleaning off the thick, black, evil-smelling mud was quite a game when we left!  Local berths occupy most of the spaces on this section of the quay with only two kept for visitors.  The water here is quiet with very little wash but the air is distinctly noisy.  The quay is occupied by a pavement restaurant whose diners are about until midnight and whose freezer plant runs all night!

 

The Visitors’ Quay opposite Cala d’en Busquats is a modern, purpose built affair where one lies rafted up alongside.  (The cala is too narrow for normal stern or bows-to mooring.)  The problem here is the almost continuous heavy wash from ferries and fishing boats that pass by alarmingly close.

 

There is no sign of the proposed marina development in Cala d’en Busquats.  It is still possible to anchor in the entrance to this cala with a line to the shore to limit swinging.  However, it is subject to swell, especially from fishing boats and the high-speed ferry.

 

 

 

Cala de Fornells

Isla de Menorca

Lat

40° 03'.9 N

Long

004° 08'.2 E

 

 

Information Date:

June, 1999

Pilot Page Number:

210

 

Cala de Fornells is delightful with good protection in most winds.  Even in northerlies, some protection can be found close in just south of the harbour.

 

When you read in the pilot book that holding is poor, believe it!  We always motor back on our anchor to ensure that it has set and, despite the large area of shallow water, we had great difficulty finding a spot where we would hold.  The best place seemed to be west of Isla Sargantana but we almost lost Retreat there when we dragged in a sudden squall that saw the wind speed increase from 5 knots to 30 knots in five minutes.  We then moved to a vacant buoy just south of the harbour where we spent four very peaceful nights without charge.  (The buoy was marked with the name of a yacht that we later discovered in Cala de Addaya.)

 

Basic provisions can be obtained in the village.  There are some excellent walks on both sides of the harbour, but beware the main road running south from the town.  It has no paths or verges and the traffic travels very fast.

 

 

 

Cala de Addaya

Isla de Menorca

Lat

40° 00'.5 N

Long

004° 12'.0 E

 

 

Information Date:

June, 1999

Pilot Page Number:

215

 

 

Cala de Addaya is one of the few fully-protected anchorages in the Balearic Islands.  We visited in moderate weather, but friends of ours have ridden out several gales at anchor there.  Holding is patchy, but generally good.    Depths are generally less than those shown in the pilot book by up to a metre.  The southern end of the cala beyond the narrows is almost deserted, but it quickly shallows to 1.5 metres or less.  Most of the surrounding land is private so walks ashore are limited.

 

 

 

Cala Grao

Isla de Menorca

Lat

39° 57'.2 N

Long

004° 16'.1 E

 

 

Information Date:

June, 1999

Pilot Page Number:

223

 

We anchored in the centre of Cala Grao in 7 metres and motored across to Isla Colom in our dinghy.  During our two hours there we had only seagulls for company – it was quite delightful.  We also enjoyed two very interesting walks on marked pathways around the Albufera Lagoon.  This is a very interesting nature reserve that is well worth visiting.

 

 

 

Puerto de Mahón

Isla de Menorca

Lat

39° 52'.1 N

Long

004° 18'.6 E

 

 

Information Date:

June, 1999

Pilot Page Number:

172

 

The huge natural harbour of Mahón provides a variety of possibilities for mooring to suit every wind and every pocket.  Despite being the capital city, charges are very reasonable enabling one to make this a base from which to explore the island.  The moorings on the quay are best avoided as a busy road runs close alongside.

 

During our several visits to Mahón we spent one night on the artificial island ‘Isla Cristina’, several nights on one of the many mooring buoys and several more at anchor in Cala Taulera.  On one occasion we attempted to moor to a buoy in Cala Llonga but hit an under-water obstruction which we believe may have been a redundant mooring block.  If one needs water, Isla Cristina is the most economic as the over-night charge there includes an unlimited supply; much better value than the metered supply on the ‘water pontoon’.

 

There is a new large supermarket built below the Market Hall at the top of the hill near the large church of Santa María.  This, together with the excellent market, provides a one-stop shopping centre for most day-to-day needs.

 

Whilst anchored in Cala Taulera we visited the fortifications on ‘La Mola’ which are now open to the public twice a week.  Details of times are given on a notice near the beach at the entrance to the site.  Visitors are supposed to have their own car, but the guide took pity on us and took us along with him.

 

 

 

Cala de Son Saura

Isla de Menorca

Lat

39° 55'.6 N

Long

003° 53'.7 E

 

 

Information Date:

June, 1999

Pilot Page Number:

191

 

We spent one night at anchor in this almost deserted cala.  Despite being completely open to the south, we managed to find reasonable protection tucked well in towards the east behind Punta Gobernadó.  Holding was excellent in clean, firm sand.  We enjoyed an interesting walk ashore visiting two ancient stone shepherds’ huts.

 

 

 

Puerto de Pollensa

Isla de Mallorca

Lat

39° 54'.2 N

Long

003° 05'.2 E

 

 

Information Date:

July, 1999

Pilot Page Number:

100

 

Pollensa Bay is one of the real gems of the Balearic Islands.  Within its confines there are two fully-protected harbours, a semi-protected yacht-club quay and a choice of at least four anchorages, one of which will serve whatever the wind direction.  The scenery is stunning and the small town of Pollensa has a good range of facilities including two fairly large supermarkets within trolley-wheeling distance of the harbour.

 

The Public Quay inside Puerto de Pollensa is fully-protected and much, much cheaper than the partially-protected yacht-club visitors’ quay that is outside the harbour.  There is a three-night limit on the Public Quay though this can be extended if the weather closes in.  Not only that, after only one night away, one can return and have another three nights and so on ad infinitum.  We spoke to a couple who had repeated this process throughout the previous season!

 

 

 

Puerto de Bonaire

Isla de Mallorca

Lat

39° 52'.1 N

Long

003° 08'.7 E

 

 

Information Date:

July, 1999

Pilot Page Number:

103

 

We left Retreat on the hard in Puerto de Bonaire for five weeks during July and August 1999 whilst we returned to the UK.  Prior to leaving her we hired a car for a couple of days and visited almost every marina and harbour on the island.  Puerto de Bonaire was the cheapest being less than half the price of some of the marinas on the south and east coasts.  We paid £322 for lift-out, storage on land for five weeks and lift-back, i.e. £9.20 per day.  This is considerably less than we would have had to pay had we left her in the water, as mooring charges during July and August are very high.